Hey, I made a shirt!

Update: Success! The shirt got a total of 30 backers so it’s going to print! Thank you to everyone who supported me by pre-ordering.  This was a fun experience, I may do more in the future.

My previous post about a font I designed was actually a bit delayed. Since designing Old Sport I have tried my hand at other typographical experiments. One such experiment I decided to submit to Cotton Bureau as a t-shirt design. And just today my design went live!

Screen Shot 2013-07-15 at 12.49.18 PM

The design, aptly titled I Can’t See Anything, is printed in light blue ink on an indigo shirt. Can you read it? Here’s a more detailed look at the design:

i cant see anything-01Can you read it now? Whether you can or you can’t if you like the design it can be ordered from its Cotton Bureau page. Make sure to tell your friends to order one, too! It will only go to print if 25 or more are ordered!

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Hey, I made a shirt!

Typography is hard

Typography has always interested me. Unfortunately, it’s not really my strongest skill. But I’ve been trying to change that. So I sat down and decided to make a font. Once I came up with the initial concept sketches I set up a grid system to work off of. In addition, I set two rules in place to aid my design process:

1. Every letter must be composed of a single, unbroken line.
2. All areas must be exactly 2 lines thick.

The result of this is a chunky geometric sans-serif font with unique curves and linear forms. I call it Old Sport. Check it out!

Check out more of this project, including usage and grid examples, on Behance.

Typography is hard

3D Graphics and Icon Design

The current trend in interface design is “flat.” Everyone is quick to strip away the depth from their designs to make things more simplified. And, honestly, I love flat interfaces. But that doesn’t mean there is no place for depth in the modern world of design. A well-executed 3D logo or icon can leave a huge impression on an audience. A great example of this is SoftFacade’s redesign of Iconfinder’s logo. To make sure they could capture the highest level of detail and accuracy in their revamp of Iconfinder’s adorable robot mascot they created it as a 3D model of the character and rendered it in high quality using a fixed camera position. Then vector shapes were drawn over the render to perfectly match the shapes, materials, and lighting. The result is an incredibly detailed 3D logo that can be scaled to any size without issue. Check it out!

3D Graphics and Icon Design

Look at My Blog!

blog_blackNo, I haven’t gone crazy. I know you are already looking at my blog! This post is actually about getting people to look at your blog! A man by the name of Brendan Mitchell had the bright idea of creating a universal symbol to help people advertise their blog through web and print. And he wasn’t alone. Both of these symbols, created entirely independently, are strikingly similar. Why? Probably because the design is very effective. It’s simple and recognizable and incorporates familiar forms in a unique way. I like it. Or, at least, I like the idea of it. The execution of both icons doesn’t entirely appeal to my tastes. Maybe I’m picky. Either way, since we are talking about a universal symbol of one of the most powerful movements in journalism since the newspaper (and because I love designing my own icons) I thought I’d take a shot at designing my own version.

My icon (shown above) utilizes the same forms as the other two with a few slight changes. All of the line widths and gaps are unified and based on strict ratios. I rounded the endcaps to give the icon a softer, more polished look. I also made sure the dimensions are square to make it easier to incorporate into icons and designs. The symbol is, of course, free to download and use as you please. You can download the icon here. The .zip file contains .eps and .ai vector versions as well as 1024 x 1024 px .png versions in both black and white. Happy blogging!

Update: the icon is now available on the Noun Project!

Look at My Blog!